Tag Archives: rules

Looking at government web analytics

25 Nov

Well, I had a very productive day in Canberra yesterday, having gone over for an event run by the Australian Bureau of Statistics on Web Analytics in Government. It was a full house, with even resident federal parliamentary tech evangelist Sen. Kate Lundy having to be turned down.

One of my favourite ways to take notes at these sessions is using mindmaps, with XMind being my tool of choice. I’ve not had a chance to do a unified map to link up the various speaker themes as yet, but there was quite a number of common themes across the spectrum. Speakers covered areas including how we’re doing it, highlighting the value analytics provides to government communication, and how much further things have to go to help agencies and stakeholders understand the value of communicating via the web.

Sadly, I needed to leave before the panel discussion commenced otherwise I would have missed my flight home. Reading Craig Thomler‘s (author of the eGov AU blog) twitter posts for the panel session, the discussion focused around if the needs of commercial and government analytics are any different. The panel of experts assembled, including Rod Jacka, Hurol Inan and others was split on the question with two either way.

So you can get an idea of what was discussed at the sessions, here’s my mindmaps from the day. They should provide you some good food for thought on the topics discussed and prod you into action. If you want the full XMind map files to reuse them, please drop me a line.

Apologies for the gallery below not providing the best way to lay these out, just trying to get them up as quickly as possible so they can be of use to people.

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Key recommendations for e-Government

28 Mar

David Osimo, Managing partner at Tech4i2 ltd and author of the Benchmarking e-government in web 2.0 blog recently posted on his presentation at the Lisbon iGov workshop on web2.0 in public administration.

His presentation is quite interesting and can be found at his post, but one thing which really stuck out for me are his recommendations for e-Government:

1: DO NO HARM

  • don’t hyper-protect public data from re-use
  • don’t launch large scale “facade” web2.0 project
  • don’t forbid web 2.0 in the workplace
  • let bottom-up initiatives flourish as barriers to entry are very low

2: ENABLE OTHERS TO DO

  • publish reusable and machine readable data (XML, RSS, RDFa) > see W3C work
  • adopt web-oriented architecture
  • create a public data catalogue > see Washington DC

3: ACTIVELY PROMOTE

  • ensure pervasive broadband
  • create e-skills in and outside government: digital literacy, media literacy, web2.0 literacy, programming skills
  • fund bottom-up initiatives through public procurement, awards
  • reach out trough key intermediaries trusted by the community
  • listen, experiment and learn-by-doing

These are some pretty good guiding rules when it comes to e-Government, and some of these themes are closely alligned with some of the issues i’m intending to write about in the coming weeks and months.

Also, David’s rules also prompted an interesting suggestion from another of his readers, Alberto Cottica:

4. MINIMISE CODE

  • don’t duplicate
  • deploy, then customise
  • let the community steer development

Those suggestions like up pretty well with some of the points I raised in my article on using Twitter within Government yesterday.